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Start by marking “Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure” as Want to Read: In her twenties, journalist Sarah Macdonald backpacked around India and came away with a lasting impression of heat, pollution and poverty. So when an airport beggar read her palm and told her she would return to. Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure and millions of other books are available for instant access. Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure Paperback – April 13, In her twenties, journalist Sarah Macdonald backpacked around India and came away with a lasting impression of heat, pollution and. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Australian radio correspondent Macdonald's rollicking memoir recounts the two years she spent in India when her.


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I've had Holy Cow! An Indian Adventure by Sarah Macdonald on my mile long list of books to read for what feels like forever. For some reason. In her twenties, journalist Sarah Macdonald backpacked around India and came away with a lasting impression of heat, pollution and poverty. So when an. A rollercoaster ride through a land of chaos and contradiction with a woman on a mission to save her soul, her love life - and her sanity.

What could possibly go wrong? When starting this book you really need to leave your sense of reality with the cover and take your imagination through this bonkers tale so you simply enjoy it. It was a wonderful read and I was honestly hooked from the start thanks to our narrator, Elsie.

Her character is fabulous! Her charming and comical voice kept me entertained throughout the full book, and I found myself chuckling away as I read. You should try it sometime.

David Duchovny did a splendid job of portraying her as stereotypical, yet hilariously loveable, teenager, using phrases such as 'bae', 'cray cray' and 'OMG'.

In fact, any interactions in the book were humorous thanks to Elsie's comical character.

ISBN 13: 9780553816013

This story would have been nowhere near as good if not told from the wonderfully bonkers point of view of Elsie the cow. Her cute illustrations were a lovely added touch to the book as well.

The religious journey she took was a great, humorous education about the various religions in India and how they all co-exist together. I did enjoy the Indian take on Christianity.

She has a wonderful, dry, sarcastic sense of humor and a thirst for understanding of other cultures and religions. She made me happy with laughter and sad with memories at the same time.

So, if you are planning a trip to India, I would recommend this book, a good source of fun information about the people, and the cows.

Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Nov 25, Aarathi rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Her descriptions of what is actually a beautiful, rich, varied culture are narrow-minded and written in a tone that makes it clear she considers herself superior to India and Indian people. Last but not least, the c "Holy Cow" by Sarah Macdonald is the author's condescending account of time she spent in India.

Last but not least, the cover image of Lord Shiva clad in sunglasses epitomizes the racism and ignorance that fill this book. View all 5 comments. Aug 22, Dorothea rated it really liked it Recommends it for: If you have a lingering, romanticized desire to travel to India, this book will cure the crap out of that.

Does this woman tell it like it is: Impossible traffic and hoards of desperate people pressing in on you from all sides, limping zombie lepers chasing you through dark alleys begging for coins, Indian men aggressively groping western women in public because they think all If you have a lingering, romanticized desire to travel to India, this book will cure the crap out of that.

Impossible traffic and hoards of desperate people pressing in on you from all sides, limping zombie lepers chasing you through dark alleys begging for coins, Indian men aggressively groping western women in public because they think all white women are sluts thanks, Hollywood.

I almost had several panic attacks while reading this book. The author, Sarah MacDonald didn't just travel to India for a month or two, she lived there for a year or two and traveled around, exploring as much of India as she could: Sarah has a background in journalism and it shows.

Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure

Sometimes her writing is stilted and leaves the reader wishing she would just drink a bunch of Feni and bare her soul for Ganesha's sake. Many of Sarah's rants are hilarious and she has some good feminist sensibilities, but where was her editor? Her editor should have rung all the tears and grit from this writer's soul onto the page and really pushed this book over the top.

One thing that seriously drove me nuts is that there is no map of India in this book! WTF, Shiva! I liked this book a lot more than I'm letting on.

I might even read it again someday. View all 6 comments. Jan 01, Amit Chawla rated it did not like it Shelves: I read the book while holidaying in Northern NSW. The reason I read this book was because it was on the bookshelf in the holiday home we had for the week. Also because it was supposed to talk about India from a Westerners perspective. Let me put it out there: It is a miserable portrayal of a difficult to understand country by a selfish Australian woman.

A lot of what she passes off in the book is exaggeration. In other words, fiction. Do NOT use this book as a decision-making tool for an Indian holiday. Describing the book in just one word: I was mugged at a well lit train station in Westren Sydney. Dec 15, Corey Fry rated it liked it. A good book that no one should take too seriously. She actually starts off a selfish, egocentric woman aghast at the quality of Indian life and grows into a spiritual investigative journalist of sorts.

I traveled to India this past year and her accounts from a western perspective are accurate. But with time, the beauty of India reveals itself to travelers and she shares this with readers. It's a funny memoir that gives a cursory background of the spiritual-religious forces existent in modern India A good book that no one should take too seriously.

It's a funny memoir that gives a cursory background of the spiritual-religious forces existent in modern India. India with humor, the only way to take the country in stride. This book captured the heart and the essence of India and its vast array of religions and cultures, all from the outsiders perspective. I have read this book a few times and know I will read it again.

But, for a bigger treat, check out the audiobook. A take on India and its many accents all with the drawl of an Australian accident.

This book made me laugh so hard while driving to assignments that I nearly wet my pants. Perfect read fo India with humor, the only way to take the country in stride. Perfect read for anyone that has been to India or plans to visit. View 2 comments. Jan 09, Denice rated it did not like it. If I could give a book negative stars, it would be this one.

This girl seemed to complain about everything she was experiencing in India.

Hi! I’m Michelle

If you want a book which will give you more insight about India, read Motiba's Tattoos! View 1 comment. Jul 17, Anirudh added it. OK first up - I haven't read this book and neither do I intend to. The simple reason being that everything a westerner or an easterner for that matter had to say about the dichotomy of modern India, has been magnificently captured and related by and any book by William Dalrymple. That's it. You won't need anything else. But the reason why I am writing this "review" is just one: The issues Indians on this discussion board have with the book's cover.

I mean, he's wearing sunglasses for crying out loud! It's not like they showed him smoking weed Which he smokes by the way.. I see he has his ever present trident..

Hindu religion, just like every other religion, has had its fair share of unacceptable practices which have gradually been outlawed so please stop acting like everything has been picture perfect since the dawn of time. We need to start taking things a little less seriously After all, religion is fiction isn't it? Deep down inside, somewhere in a a dark corner of your heart, you know there is no one out there Personally speaking, I would have loved to see him smoking weed.

Would have made him look a lot cooler: View all 3 comments. It was interesting to look at Indian diversity and idiosyncrasies through the eyes of an outsider who wanted to make sense of the chaos. I loved it. It is one of the very few books which I have re-read and enjoyed. Sarah Macdonald, an Australian journalist, broadcaster and presenter, did not like India on her first visit and never wanted to return. But she returns to India after almost 11 years to be with her boyfriend Jonathan Haley.

She writes right at the beginning: But soon she decides to make the best of her stay in India, since Jonathan was away most of the time for long duration owing to wok commitments. Some may find a few of her observations or comments offensive, but you must remember while reading this book, or any such book, that this is a personal journey of the author. In this particular book, we find Sarah Macdonald transform from an atheist to someone who begins to enjoy the expansive spiritual roads India offers, its many religions.

At the end, if you really read it with an open mind, there is not a thing to offend.

Friday, March 03, 2006

Few gems from the book: About the Hindi she learnt from her teacher who scoffed at the use of street language: I can be a believer in something bigger than what I can touch. I truly love it. Review Book courtesy: I'm actually surprised I disliked this book as much as I did! I expected an hilarious account of a girl travelling to India, a place where she'd been to previously but never wanted to return to. Well, she did and she did do some travelling but it wasn't hilarious by any stretch of the imagination She used to be a radio host in Sydney, so I figured I'd really relate to her humour but hm, there just wasn't much of that.

Since I listened to the audiobook, read by the author, what I must credit to I'm actually surprised I disliked this book as much as I did! Since I listened to the audiobook, read by the author, what I must credit to her was her ability to put on an Indian English accent!

That was hilarious at first but, unfortunately, the funnyness of it wore off after a while. Her openess and honesty to share her feelings and struggles relocating to India for her boyfriend's sake, later husband, was somewhat refreshing but at the same time I found her incredibly naive, not just about India but about the world in general.

And her jumping to conclusions and from religion to religion felt superficial and without any real insight. Her explorations of different religions felt like nothing more than someone dabbling in a bit of religious experience. She ultimately failed to really connect with any of them, and just returned to Australia and that was it.

Again, her understanding of cross-cultural issues and religions was naive and shallow.

If it had been hilarious, at least that would have made me laugh, and I might have been inclined to overlook the superficiality of her journey more generally. I also didn't appreciate that she constantly harped on about how dirty India is - admittedly, I haven't been to India but I would expect it not to be as clean as Australia in any shape or form.

Of course, it would be a culture shock but you'd think after a year or so she'd be used to it a bit, wouldn't you? View all 12 comments. Aug 08, Lori rated it did not like it Shelves: I enjoy books exploring the different cultures and customs of the world.

I tried, I truly tried to finish it, but with so many wonderful books out there waiting to be read, I couldn't justify spending another minute listening to this poor, lost woman attempt to "find herself" or the meaning of life that she was so desperately seeking. I had read reviews mentioning that ther I enjoy books exploring the different cultures and customs of the world.

I had read reviews mentioning that there was a lot of "religion" here and knowing India's varied religious background, I was prepared for some of that. I was looking for a book that explored the people, the cultures and the sites of India from the perspective of an "outsider. When one didn't work, she'd jump to another and when that failed to bring peace, she'd try another group. Since I am at peace this endless jumping made me first of all sad for her that she is so obviously lost and unable to find her way and number 2 weary of the endless detailed speculations about hopeless religious practices.

Book Review: Holy Cow! An Indian Adventure by Sarah Macdonald

Feb 19, Ashu rated it did not like it Recommends it for: People who can filter negativity. After reading first chapter, I realized what I am heading to, but continued to read, as a bestseller should have some salt. And, indeed it was there, just in the name of crass Ozzie sense of humor she kept on rubbing on, Indian wounds.

Though her depiction of situation of civic situations in India and obscurity of religions is very true.

But, when it becomes continuous ranting and predictable, it becomes derogatory and prejudiced. When she is deriding india she gets very detailed and elaborate, b After reading first chapter, I realized what I am heading to, but continued to read, as a bestseller should have some salt. So she has all negative facts but none of the good ones. The final message she gave is, stay in India made me love Australia, and probably she loved India for this fact.

Last but not the least, in first chapter she said number Zero was not discovery of India but an Arabian country. This shows she is very strong on her convictions, so did not even try to validate history of Zero before making such an statement. Sep 28, K.

I enjoyed it and felt a little ashamed for enjoying it so much. The best chapter is the one about the Vipassana ten-day meditation boot-camp. I've done that, and she nailed it.

The tone of the book bothers me, though. It's written from a position of comfortable privilege: I think the author genuinely responds viscerally and spiritually to India, but I'd rather read a less-mediated version of India from, say, Arundhati Roy, I enjoyed it and felt a little ashamed for enjoying it so much. I think the author genuinely responds viscerally and spiritually to India, but I'd rather read a less-mediated version of India from, say, Arundhati Roy, or Bapsi Sidhwa.

Mar 09, Peggy rated it did not like it Shelves: I wish I could give this book zero stars. What a condescending, racist piece of garbage. Why write about going to India if you didn't even like it? I saw this book sold in stores everywhere in India and I wish they would take it off the shelves. Sarah MacDonald is a peddler of lies about this truly phenomenal country. Please don't read it. The first third of the book is fantastical poverty porn and reads like slumdog Borat attends Ripley's!

There are lepers begging at the airport, ash-smeared naked aghoris at traffic signals in central Delhi, earthquakes that claimed hundreds and yet ' hardly is in the news ' because it's common in India, Apollo is ' the only good hospital in New Delhi ' but is ' half a city away ' and has a 'For Poor People' special entrance, her boyfriend has to stay with her in her hospital room since rapes are very The first third of the book is fantastical poverty porn and reads like slumdog Borat attends Ripley's!

There are lepers begging at the airport, ash-smeared naked aghoris at traffic signals in central Delhi, earthquakes that claimed hundreds and yet ' hardly is in the news ' because it's common in India, Apollo is ' the only good hospital in New Delhi ' but is ' half a city away ' and has a 'For Poor People' special entrance, her boyfriend has to stay with her in her hospital room since rapes are very common in Indian hospitals, hijackings, dead cows, dowry deaths, female infanticide, child marriage, girls not allowed into schools, vomit, urination, pollution, population, brown skin, phlegm, crowds, beggars, astrologers, green goo, paan, etc.

Her " you know what, I am in a strange foreign land where everything is strange, so up your's " narrative is one where anything strange and only strange that may have happened is mentioned a model shot dead in an illegal bar, a superstar hitting his actress girlfriend, a monkey causing panic in Delhi, etc.

Crass, cheap, voyeuristic, patronising, and just plain fantasy. The rest of the book, though better in terms of content, still suffers from her over-the-top recital. Every hotel she checks into is filthy and without water or power or both, trains and flights always seem like crashing; all Muslims, Buddhists, Sikhs and Christians she meets seem to be unhappy with India and either want a separate state or join Pakistan or China.

Indians are very shy about public displays of affection, the parental bond is very strong, social mores are very critical, the traditions are strange, there are festivals of colours and lights, wedding rituals and last rites, all of which seem very eccentric and queer.So three and a half stars rounded up to four because Sarah is just the sort of person you'd love to go out to lunch with and amid the chatter she would tell you about how these a-mazing people she met in India are coming to stay and would you like to meet them?

If it had been hilarious, at least that would have made me laugh, and I might have been inclined to overlook the superficiality of her journey more generally. But if that is the only one you are going to read about it becomes very boring. I loved this book once I finished it; however, the cover, title and back cover are misleading. Impossible traffic and hoards of desperate people pressing in on you from all sides, limping zombie lepers chasing you through dark alleys begging for coins, Indian men aggressively groping western women in public because they think all white women are sluts thanks, Hollywood.

Aug 07, Heather rated it it was ok Shelves: Which are sprinkled throughout the book.

But her purpose seemed to be more than that, to tell of her spiritual journey in India, the growth she experienced as a result of sampling a number of different religions. Last but not least, the c "Holy Cow" by Sarah Macdonald is the author's condescending account of time she spent in India. It's a land of elephants and snakes to some, while it could be a land of the Kohinoor to another.

SHAWNA from Idaho
I do relish reading novels perfectly . Browse my other posts. I have always been a very creative person and find it relaxing to indulge in singing in choir.