instruktsiya.info Politics Analisis Tapak Edward T White Pdf

ANALISIS TAPAK EDWARD T WHITE PDF

Saturday, December 21, 2019


Analisa Tapak by Edward T instruktsiya.info - Download as Word Doc .doc /.docx), PDF File .pdf) or view presentation slides online. Susunan dan poin-poin. Analisa Tapak by Edward T White Docx - Free download as Word Doc .doc /. docx), PDF File .pdf) or view presentation slides online. perencanaan tapak. Site Analysis: Diagramming lnformation for Architectural Design CopyrightQ by Edward T. White All rights reserved Printed in the United.


Author:ROSALIE PLAKKE
Language:English, Spanish, Japanese
Country:Solomon Islands
Genre:Fiction & Literature
Pages:595
Published (Last):13.11.2015
ISBN:664-1-26612-866-4
ePub File Size:22.51 MB
PDF File Size:10.72 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:36158
Uploaded by: TONDA

Site Analysis Publisher: Architechtural Media () by Edward T. White | pages | PDF | 40 Mb instruktsiya.info if you need. By submitting your contact information, you consent to receive communication from Prezi containing information on Prezi's products. You can. Edward T White Analisis Tapak instruktsiya.info Download Free Online books! Said- actions speak up the verge of s, mineko iwasaki. With whom.

To complete the model we must perform the same operation for users and context. The facts about our site will always include both hard and soft data. The hard data usually relate to physical site factors and involve no judgments about their existence or nature. These deal primarily with the sensory and human aspects of the site that are not quantitative and which require an opinion about the existence and positive or negative characteristics of certain site qualities. White page 4.

Typical examples include good and bad views from the site. We are not concerned with design responses to the site at this stage but rather with finding out all we can about the site. We are interested in facts. Typical hard data would be site location.

This "soft data". Soft data may involve some value judgments on our part in conducting the contextual analysis.

Documents Similar To Analisa Tapak by Edward T White.docx

Where utilities are some distance from the site. Analysis should also document the present and prorected zoning trends. Off site features may include characteristics of surrounding development such as scale. It is use. Data ineludes duration and peak loads for surround iog veh icular traffic and pedestrian movement" bus stops. This may be extended further to include dO important factor or because of the scale of the proiecr Map may show existing and projected uses.

Traffic analysis should include future projections insofar as they Can be made. Typical utility types include electricity. City map may liso show distances and travel times to related functions in other parts of the city.. Some examples of situations that might cause a space or activity to be placed In the scheme due to external linkages to COntext are presented below. Activities needing direct sunlight. Intensity and quality positive or negative of the sensory issues.

Activities requiring Or desiring a view. They are in a very real sense competing with each other to determine the building form.. I I I I 20 It is useful in discussing the influence of contextual analysis on design to ditferentiate between function and context as forces which locate building spaces and activities on the site. Activities that should be zoned away from noise.

Integration of form With surrounding contextual images. In context. Usually in a design problem these two and all the other project issues pull and push the spaces 10 determine their final placement in the scheme. Also included are prevailing wind directions. Act ivi t ies that shou Id strongly relate to on sue pedestrian circulation patterns. Operations needing shelter from high activity zones.

Activities needing direct access for vehides. Also of importance are any scheduled or informal ac ivities in the neighborhood such as festivals. Operations needing access to delivery and pickup veh icles. Building entry IDeated to relate to primary approach direction. Jearl icr In th.

In function. As discussed earlier. While page 6. Typical issues are views 10 and from the sue and noise generated around the site It ISof value to record the type.. It IShelpful to know noi only how climate conditions varv over a typical year but also what the crirical conditions might be maximum daily rainfall. Vandalism and crime patterns. This will never happen. Normally there are two components to any site information diagram.

That confidence fdcilitates the conceptualization of site responses in design and contributes to the heuristic process of idea formulation. The first we may call the composite or integrated approach where we attempt to diagram as many different site issues as we can over one referent drawing Here.

Relation of floors to contours. The third step deals with schematic design of a site plan as well as a preliminary cost estimate for the site. Step four involves more developed designs and a detailed cost estimate. Step five is the construction documents or the plan. Bidding and contracting for the project follows as step six.

[Ebook Arsitektur] come to see

Construction then will take place as step seven. The final step, step eight, in the site design process is occupation and management of the site. Elements[ edit ] Numerous elements go into a given site analysis. These elements include location , neighborhood context, site and zoning , legal elements, natural physical features, man-made features, circulation , utilities , sensory , human and cultural, and climate components.

Aerial photographs help in this assessment stage. There should be documentation of distances and time from major places. This should be completed by either driving or walking the distance first-hand.

Numerous issues at this stage require direct observation. Features of this sort include architectural patterns, street lighting, and condition of existing buildings. This would also include the immediate surroundings of the site.

The reaction of the surrounding buildings towards the site and people moving around should be analysed. White All rights reserved Printed in the United. F' -; al! Y-o I r. Crc C! SD 3 5sD! SD x- SD "sD 9. These influences have enriched and diversified contemporary architecture in the developed world. Beri apresiasi terhadap thread ini Gan! White Tampilkan semua Post. Kaskus Addict Posts: Analisis Tapak. White pages PDF 40 Mb.

Tempat diskusi seputar arsitektur, baik keilmuan maupun terapan, termasuk cara membangun dan mendesain rumah. Hot Threads. Mau Tampil Ala Westeros? Fans Game of Thrones Masuk! We must havesome idea about how long a e n event or pressure ass, when it peaks, when it starts and ends, how it. For each fact we collect we should ask ourselves about the future with respectto that particularcategory.

Our building will occupy the site for a long time. We want it to effectively respond to all surrounding conditions over its life span.

It is desirable to look at the next con- textual layer of issues beyondthe ones we are addressing. Contextual analyses are theoretically open ended in that there are no inherent logical stopping points. We could continue to On the other hand there is sometimes a temptation to arbitrarily terminate our analysis before we should.

Strategi Presentasi Dalam Arsitektur by Edward T. White

The important point here is to think about the appropriate extension of the analysis for each piece of information. How far do we go with our data collection for each information type? Examples include deciding how many blocks beyond our site to incorporate inthe analysis, whether to analyze what created existing traffic patterns, whether to infer certain things about the neighborhood by what we seeand whether to conduct house to house interviews.

These judgments all involve decisions on our part about the importance and relevancy of the informa- tion to either the verification of data or to design. In contextual analysis we are con- stantly making judgments about how deeply or accurately we must research a particular site topic. This issue is being raisednot to providean excusefor asloppy job but to recognize that the "absolutely complete" contextual analysis does not exist andthat under the pressureof time we mustbesomewhatselectiveaboutwhat we address in our site study.

The goal is a contextual analysis researched through all its contexts of contexts. The reality is al- ways something short of that. Our contextual analysis should record what information is "hard" non- negotiable and what is "soft. Hard data involves things like site boundary, legal description, site area and utility locations.

Some thin. It is helpful to classify the information according to "firmness" because it provides a sense of the required sequence of attention to data when we begin design, We generally must couewith the hard datafirst inourearlv site decisions There should be a sense of priority This is normally a result of the intensity of about the information we collect and the site conditions and whether they are record.

It is useful when we begin design to have a sense of whether something is of great value and should be saved, enhanced and reinforced or whether something is very negative and should beeliminated, avoided orscreened. A systematic approach more easily permits us to cope with information overload in complex situations. A fine-grained approach to analysis fosters a fine-grained approach to de- sign synthesis where contextual oppor- tunities and problems have less of a chance tor1slipthrough the cracks" and thus be left behind during design synthesis.

The more individual contextual factors we uncover and document in analysis of the site, the more cues we provide for ourselves in triggering site response concepts.

We are not concerned with design responsesto the site at this stage but ratherwith finding out all we can about the site. We are interested in facts. The facts about our site will always include both hard and soft data. The hard data usually relate to physical site factors and involve no judgments about their existence or na- ture. Typical hard data would be site loca- tion, dimensions, contours, on site features and climate.

Soft data may involve some value judgments on our part in conducting the contextual analysis.

Site analysis

These deal prima- rily with the sensory and human aspects of the site that are not quantitative and which require an opinion about the existenceand positive or negative characteristics of cer- tain sitequalities. Typical examplesinclude good and bad views from the site, best approach directions to th. This "soft data", although it initially involves judgments, tends to become "hard data" once it is documented in the contextual analysis.

It is import We ways open to interpretation in design and should never expect the amount and are usually the most negotiable when de- importance of site data to be equal signing for the site in schematics.

Eachsite In attempting to organize the types of is different and the imbalance in how information that we collect about a the information is distributed among site, there are several headings that the headingsand the different Patterns of emphasis given to the information communicate a great deal to us when we begin to respond to the contextual analysis in design.

The data outline presented next has no particular meaning behind its sequence other than the fact that it separatessite data from climate data and proceeds from gen- eral overview issuesto more detailed ones. City map may also show distances and travel times to related functions in other parts of the city. This may be extended further to include an important factor or because of the scale of the project. Map may show existing and projected uses, buildings, zoning and any other conditions that may have an impact on our project.

SIZE AND ZONING Documents all the dimensional aspects of the site includ- ing boundaries, location and dimension of easements and present zoning classifica- tion with all its dimensional implications setbacks, height restrictions, parking for- mulas, allowed uses, etc.

Analysis should also document the present and projected zoning trends, plans by the city transportation department to widen roads change rights of way and any othertrend that mightaffectour project in the future. LEGAL This category presents the legal description of the property, covenants and restrictions, present ownership, present governmental jurisdiction city or county and any future projections that may influ- ence the project such as the fact that the site is in afuture city urban renewal area or within the boundaries of eventual univer- sity expansion.

Off site features may include characteristics of surrounding de- velopment such as scale, roof forms, fenestration patterns, setbacks, materials, colors, open spaces, visual axes, paving patterns, landscaping materials and pat- terns, porosity and assertiveness of wall forms and accessories and details.

Dataincludes duration and peak loads for surrounding vehicular traffic and pedestrian movement, bus stops, site access edges, traffic generators, service truck access and intermittent traffic parades, fire truck routes, concerts at nearby auditorium. Traffic analysis should include future projections insofar as they Y can be made. Typical utility types include electricity, gas, sewer, water and telephone.

Where utilities are some distance from the site, those dimen- sions should be given. Analisa Tapak by Edward T White Docx It is useful to docu- ment the depths of utilities when they are underground as well as the pipe material and diameter. It is of behavioral and sociological aspects. This value to record the type, duration, intensity category is different from "Neighborhood and quality positive or negative of the Context" listed earlier in that the latter ad- sensory issues.

As discussed earlier, this dresses the physical while this category often involves making some judgments deals with the activities, human relation- about the relative desirability of the differ- ships and patterns of human characteris- ent sensory conditions on and around the tics. Issues here might involve population site. Also of importance are any scheduled or informal activities in the neighborhood Vandalism and crime patterns, although not pleasant, are of value to designers when conceptualizing site zoning and building design.

CLIMATE Presents all the pertinent cli- mate conditions such as rainfall, snowfall, humidity and temperature variations over the months of the year. Also included are prevailing wind directions, sun-path and vertical sun angles as they changeover the year and potential natural catastrophes such as tornados, hurricanes and earth- quakes.

It is helpful to know not only how climate conditions vary over a typical year but also what the critical conditions might be maximum daily rainfall, peak wind velocity. It involves know- ingwhat we haveto work with interms of site before we begin to work with it in site zoning. Like function, image or building envelope, it is another way of entering the problem, of making our first conceptual decisions which form the designer-made context for sub- sequent decisions. Althoughthe facts we collect about our site may be influenced by the building images that inevitably come to mind as we do the contextual analysis, we should attempt to keep conceptualization separate from the contextual analysis.

The contextual analysis should be an inventory of existing and projected conditions assumingno new building on the site so that when we begin to design for the site we do not confuse what is actually there now with what we wish was there or hope to put there. Analisa Tapak by Edward T White.

Analisa Tapak by Edward T White.docx

Func- tion tends to locate building spaces in an introverted way in that they are primarily looking inward to each other for the rationale behindtheir positions in the scheme. Context, on the other hand, wants the spaces to migrate to different positions on the site in re- sponse to conditions outsidethe build- ing.

In function, the attraction is be- tween spaces.

In context, the attrac- tion is between spaces and external site conditions. Usually in a design problem these two and all the other project issues pull and push the spaces to determine their final placement in the scheme. They are in a very real sense competing with each other to determine the building form.

Some examples of situations that might cause a space or activity to be placed in the scheme due to external linkages to context are presented below. Operations need- ing access to de- livery and pick- up vehicles. Building entry lo- cated to relate to primary ap- proach direc- tion. Zoning of parking areas away from view lines to building. Activities needing indirect natural lighting. Activities needing direct sunlight. Operations need- ing shelter from high activity zones. Activities needing direct access for vehicles.

Relationship of spaces to exist- ing scale and geometric pat- terns. Spaces needing their own con- trolled exterior environment.In doing the con- textual analysisandengagingthe site issues through diagramming, we trigger design responseimagesfor dealingwith the site. The deed is held by the owner of the title insurance company. We must be sure to make the referent drawing as simple as possible keeping in mind that the data to be recorded over it must be graphically bolder and more important than the referent in- formation.

Typical site issuesaddressedinacontextual analysis are site location, size, shape, con- tours, drainage patterns, zoning and set- backs, utilities, significant on site features buildings, trees, etc.

All of the effects or consequence It behooves us to not only know something about the compositional characters of buildings. A thorough contextual analysis gives us confidence that we have the site conditions all recorded.

Sl S Issues here might involve population site. Greek language and literature.

Too often we m.

OLIMPIA from West Virginia
Review my other articles. I absolutely love brazilian jiu-jitsu. I am fond of sharing PDF docs zestfully .